Can I use an electric grill on my lanai or balcony?

As of January 1, 2018, the fire-related codes have changed and now permit electric grills on lanais/balconies provided that they conform to the current NFPA 1 Florida Fire Prevention Code 2015 edition. North Collier Fire Control and Rescue District enforces the Florida Fire Prevention Code National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) I, Uniform Fire Code 2015 Edition, Chapter 10 General Fire Safety, Section 10.11.6.

10.10.6.1.1: Listed electric portable, tabletop grills, not to exceed 200 square inches of cooking surface, or other similar apparatus shall be permitted.

10.10.6.3: Listed equipment permanently installed in accordance with its listing, applicable codes, and manufacturer’s instructions shall be permitted.

Can I use a gas grill on my lanai or balcony?

North Collier Fire Control and Rescue District enforces the Florida Fire Prevention Code National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) I, Uniform Fire Code 2015 Edition, Chapter 10 General Fire Safety, Section 10.11.6.

For one- and two-family dwellings: Yes

For other than one- and two-family dwellings: No
10.10.6.1: No hibachi, grill or other similar devices used for cooking, heating or any other purpose shall be used or kindled on any balcony, under any overhanging portion, or within 10 ft. of any structure.

Can I store a gas grill on my lanai?

North Collier Fire Control and Rescue District enforces the Florida Fire Prevention Code National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) I, Uniform Fire Code 2015 Edition, Chapter 10 General Fire Safety, Section 10.11.6.

For one- and two-family dwellings: Yes

For other than one- and two-family dwellings: No
10.10.6.2 No hibachi, grill or other similar devices used for cooking shall be stored on a balcony.

Can I store a gas cylinder inside or outside my home?

Storage of gas cylinders within a residential structure, including a basement or garage, is dependent upon the type of cylinder. North Collier Fire Control and Rescue District enforces the Florida Fire Prevention Code National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 58 Liquefied Petroleum Gas Code 2014 Edition, Chapter 8 – Storage within Residential Buildings.

8.3.5 Storage Within Residential Buildings:
Storage of cylinders within a residential building, including the basement or any storage area in a common basement of a multiple-family building and attached or detached garages, shall be limited to cylinders each with a maximum water capacity of 2.7 lb (1.2 kg) and shall not exceed 5.4 lb (2.4 kg) aggregate water capacity per each living space unit.

8.4.1.1 Storage Outside of Buildings:
Storage outside of buildings for cylinders awaiting use or resale or that are part of a cylinder exchange point shall be located as follows: (1) at least 5 ft (1.5 m) from any doorway or opening in a building frequented by the public where occupants have at least two means of egress as defined by NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2) At least 10 ft (3 m) from any doorway or opening in a building or sections of a building that has only one means of egress.

What are the rules for obstruction of a fire hydrant or fire protection appliance?

The Florida Fire Prevention Code NFPA 1 requires that fire hydrants be kept accessible to the fire department at all times. “No person shall place or keep any post, fences, vehicle, growth, vegetation, trash or storage of any other materials that would obstruct the hydrant and hinder or prevent its immediate use by fire department personnel.” Clearance requirements for fire hydrants are seven and one half feet (7 ft. 6 in.) in front of and to the sides of the hydrant, with a four foot (4 ft.) clearance to the rear. Clearance requirements for fire protection appliances are seven and one half feet (7 ft. 6 in.) in front of and to the sides of the appliances. This includes back flow prevention with the F.D.C. connections. Non-adherence to these guidelines can cause delays in finding and using fire hydrants and fire protection equipment.